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Furious rail passengers across England fail to get home for World Cup clash over shortage of drivers



'I hope football does a better job coming home tonight than I am': Furious passengers across England fail to get home for World Cup clash over mysterious shortage of drivers and 'train faults'

  • Football fans left furious when train cancellations left them late for the game
  • Angry commuters said they would miss part of the England v Croatia match 
  • Train company Southern Rail said a shortage of drivers was causing the delays

By Zoie O'brien For Mailonline

Published: 14:54 EDT, 11 July 2018 | Updated: 17:16 EDT, 11 July 2018

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England fans were left furious as they struggled to get home for the World Cup clash with Croatia because of a shortage of drivers on the nation's railways.

Customers travelling with Great Northern, Southern Rail, East Midlands Trains and Thames Link were stuck after a long day at work as they attempted to get home for the game.

Many were told a 'driver shortage' was to blame - coinciding with the World Cup game in Russia. 

Great Northern told passengers delays were down to a shortage of drivers on the network, as others blamed 'train faults'.

Caroline Sharp tweeted: ‘I hope football does a better job coming home tonight than I am! Strangely, no drivers available to run the trains’.

Football fans took to Twitter to complain about not being able to get back in time for the game
Football fans took to Twitter to complain about not being able to get back in time for the game

Football fans took to Twitter to complain about not being able to get back in time for the game

A driver shortage was hailed as a 'shambled' on Wednesday as footie fans were left stranded 
A driver shortage was hailed as a 'shambled' on Wednesday as footie fans were left stranded 

A driver shortage was hailed as a 'shambled' on Wednesday as footie fans were left stranded 

Other fans said there should be TV screens in the stations where fans were not able to make it home on time
Other fans said there should be TV screens in the stations where fans were not able to make it home on time

Other fans said there should be TV screens in the stations where fans were not able to make it home on time

Fans were stuck at stations instead of being in the pub for the football on Wednesday evening 
Fans were stuck at stations instead of being in the pub for the football on Wednesday evening 

Fans were stuck at stations instead of being in the pub for the football on Wednesday evening 

Chris Billett said: ‘Watching this service from @GTRailUK, which left Victoria almost on time, become increasingly delayed into Gatwick due to ‘a shortage of train drivers’. Which begs the question who the living fuck is driving it, albeit slowly?’

Dave Benson Phillips was left furious he and hundreds of others would not be home in time for kick-off.

He wrote to Southern Rail: ‘Thanks to a cancelled Littlehampton-bound train, a lack of drivers, and a woeful bit of mis-direction by @SouthernRailUK staff, I am now on the wrong train. I fear that I will not be home in time for the match. #startwithoutme COME ON ENGLAND!!!!!!!!!!!!’

Fans were celebrating all over the country but rail users were left stranded due to faults and river shortages 
Fans were celebrating all over the country but rail users were left stranded due to faults and river shortages 

Fans were celebrating all over the country but rail users were left stranded due to faults and river shortages 

Joe Sanderson wrote on Twitter: 'And where are all the train drivers who were roistered to work? could it be that they are watching the football and showing the same contempt for commuters as and the Southern Rail, Network Rail, Thames Link Rail and the RMT Union keep displaying?'

East Midlands trains were hailed as heroes this morning when they changed train timetables to read ‘it’s coming home’ ahead of England’s World Cup clash with Croatia.

However, just hours later the railway company was being blasted by fans after train cancellations means they may not be able to catch the game.

Football fans heading home to Sheffield from London were planning on taking the 16.31pm train, which takes around two hours to get into Sheffield.

From there, they could rush home or into the pub and make kick off at 7pm.

Former musician Richard Coles said he would never be back in time because the last possible train to get him home for 7pm was cancelled
Former musician Richard Coles said he would never be back in time because the last possible train to get him home for 7pm was cancelled

Former musician Richard Coles said he would never be back in time because the last possible train to get him home for 7pm was cancelled

But a fault with the train meant the service was cancelled and dreams of watching Gareth Southgate’s boys in the semi-final were dashed.

Angry supporters used social media to blast rail bosses – including pop star turned vicar Richard Coles.

East Midlands Trains said it was a train fault which led to the cancellations and not a driver shortage
East Midlands Trains said it was a train fault which led to the cancellations and not a driver shortage

East Midlands Trains said it was a train fault which led to the cancellations and not a driver shortage

Love it when @EMTrains cancel your train home therefore meaning you miss the first half of the semi final... football might be coming home but apparently I’m not

East Midlands Trains wrote: 'We are sorry for the cancellation Darren, this is unfortunately due to a fault on the train this afternoon. Please fill in a delay repay form to receive compensation for your journey today.' 

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