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Office staff in trendy Manchester workspace left devastated as their free mid-week beer is stopped



'This is bang out of order!': Office staff in trendy new Manchester workspace are left devastated as their free mid-week beer is stopped

  • WeWork staff voiced their frustrations on a forum after the decision to limit beer 
  • An admin replied to workers, mentioning concern over office 'drinking culture' 
  • He then appealed for patience while a decision is made on the next move 

By Leigh Mcmanus For Mailonline

Published: 20:58 EST, 11 January 2019 | Updated: 20:59 EST, 11 January 2019

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Workers at a trendy new technology startup work space in Manchester are fuming that their 'unlimited free beer' is being cut down. 

The WeWork staff voiced their frustrations on a forum after the decision to limit booze was made due to 'complaints about noise'. 

An admin responded to the torrent of frustrated workers who bemoaned the company for promising benefits such as a 'relaxed working environment' that included the 'unlimited beer'. 

An admin replied to workers, mentioning concern over office 'drinking culture'. Pictured is the Manchester branch of WeWork in 1 St Peter's Square 
An admin replied to workers, mentioning concern over office 'drinking culture'. Pictured is the Manchester branch of WeWork in 1 St Peter's Square 

An admin replied to workers, mentioning concern over office 'drinking culture'. Pictured is the Manchester branch of WeWork in 1 St Peter's Square 

The admin said: 'I cannot deny that there have been concerns raised regarding the drinking culture in our office and striking the balance between being a professional working environment and one that is relaxed is very difficult.'

He then appealed for patience while a decision is made on the next move 'by the end of next week'. 

As it stands, the limitations only apply Monday through Wednesday.

WeWork came under fire recently for trailing a cut-down on beer in one of its New York city offices. 

Workers were allegedly limited to four 12-ounce glasses of beer available on tap per day, according to a copy of the email sent to members obtained by CNN Business.

One person in the Manchester forum stated that they'd been told the unlimited free beer, a USP for the company, was now being limited to 5-7pm on Thursday and Friday, according to TheOutline.

People stand outside a WeWork co-working space in New York City, New York U.S
People stand outside a WeWork co-working space in New York City, New York U.S

People stand outside a WeWork co-working space in New York City, New York U.S

The original poster on the forum said the move was 'inconsistent with both what we were informed when we signed up and what wework channels as its USP.'   

'Absolutely stupid to just be off without announcement! We signed up based on perks that seem to be depleting by the week, yet very high rents. '

'This is bang out of order!' said another person on the forum. 

WeWork, which is New York City's largest office tenant, has opened 34 sites in London and another two in Manchester.

Another nine locations are planned for the UK, despite fears that the country could be heading towards a disorderly Brexit.

Despite this, the UK and Ireland boss of the firm, Mathieu Proust, doubled down on the company's commitment to the British market.

'We're really committed to London,' he said. 'London has been a real proof of our business model.'  

Mr Proust added that the company was 'always looking' for new sites.

WeWork has also expanded rapidly in Dublin, where it now has four sites and one more planned in response to what Mr Proust called 'overwhelming' demand.

 

 

 

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