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Call the cleaners: Dad and son duo shocked at obsessive shopper's £40,000 worth of stuff



Obsessive shopper who spent £20K online and has to JUMP over his purchases to get into bed is visited by extreme cleaners who remove 150 BOXES from his one bedroom flat

  • Peter Stuart, 54, an obsessive shopper from Paisley, Scotland, appears on ITV
  • Call The Cleaners shows how his habit had left him with £20,000 of clutter 
  • Father-and-son cleaning duo Steve and Jamie Hughes cleared over 150 boxes
  • They described it as the most they've seen come out of a one-bedroom flat

By Jessica Rach For Mailonline

Published: 08:53 EST, 12 February 2019 | Updated: 10:19 EST, 12 February 2019

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An extreme hoarder with an obsessive shopping habit spent £20,000 on clutter that became piled up to the ceiling in just nine months.

Peter Stuart, a 54-year-old obsessive shopper from Paisley, Scotland, was forced to call father-and-son cleaning duo Steve, 61, and Jamie Hughes, 40, to his home after it became so full he was barely able to get to his bed.

Appearing on ITV's Call The Cleaners on Tuesday, the cleaners are left shocked by just how much stuff has piled up in the former disco dancing champion's one-bedroom flat.

Peter has lived in his home for nine years, but due to his shopping habit - which he says started happening after he received a brain injury - the flat has become almost unlivable.  

Peter Stuart, a 54-year-old obsessive shopper from Paisley, Scotland, appears on ITV's Call The Cleaners on Tuesday and tells how he spent £20,000 on clutter that became piled up to the ceiling in just nine months
Peter Stuart, a 54-year-old obsessive shopper from Paisley, Scotland, appears on ITV's Call The Cleaners on Tuesday and tells how he spent £20,000 on clutter that became piled up to the ceiling in just nine months

Peter Stuart, a 54-year-old obsessive shopper from Paisley, Scotland, appears on ITV's Call The Cleaners on Tuesday and tells how he spent £20,000 on clutter that became piled up to the ceiling in just nine months

Cleaning duo Steve and Jamie Hughes made their way through the corridor but are unable to get into the living room, pictured, due the mountains of clutter
Cleaning duo Steve and Jamie Hughes made their way through the corridor but are unable to get into the living room, pictured, due the mountains of clutter

Cleaning duo Steve and Jamie Hughes made their way through the corridor but are unable to get into the living room, pictured, due the mountains of clutter

Seen afterwards: In just four days they manage to clear most of the clutter, leaving the home unrecognisable as an ecstatic Peter returns
Seen afterwards: In just four days they manage to clear most of the clutter, leaving the home unrecognisable as an ecstatic Peter returns

Seen afterwards: In just four days they manage to clear most of the clutter, leaving the home unrecognisable as an ecstatic Peter returns

As the shocked cleaning duo battle to get through his packed corridor, Peter is seen climbing over the mound of clutter in his sitting room, joking: 'I get out of breath just coming from the sitting room.'  

The pair make their way through the corridor but are unable to get into the living room due to the mountains of clutter.

'This is all stuff I bought without realising what I was doing', he says.

Peter believes it has happened as a result to damage to his brain, explaining: 'I was attacked in a shopping centre and left for dead.'

Pointing to the piles of purchases, including empty boxes, unpacked goods, packaging and papers, he adds: 'I think it's caused some kind of reaction - that's £20,000 I've spent.'

He was forced to call father-and-son cleaning duo Steve and Jamie Hughes, seen here, to his home after it became so full he was barely able to get to his bed.
He was forced to call father-and-son cleaning duo Steve and Jamie Hughes, seen here, to his home after it became so full he was barely able to get to his bed.

He was forced to call father-and-son cleaning duo Steve and Jamie Hughes, seen here, to his home after it became so full he was barely able to get to his bed.

Appearing on ITV's Call The Cleaners on Tuesday, the cleaners are left shocked by just how much stuff has piled up in the former disco dancing champion's one-bedroom flat. The corridor is seen
Appearing on ITV's Call The Cleaners on Tuesday, the cleaners are left shocked by just how much stuff has piled up in the former disco dancing champion's one-bedroom flat. The corridor is seen

Appearing on ITV's Call The Cleaners on Tuesday, the cleaners are left shocked by just how much stuff has piled up in the former disco dancing champion's one-bedroom flat. The corridor is seen

Peter has lived in his home for nine years. He is even seen receiving a delivery during the clean-out process
Peter has lived in his home for nine years. He is even seen receiving a delivery during the clean-out process

Peter has lived in his home for nine years. He is even seen receiving a delivery during the clean-out process

And Steve and Jamie find the rest of the flat is no better, with the kitchen so piled high with appliances and piles of purchases, they are unable to push the door open.

Similarly, the bedroom is so full with clutter that Peter has to jump from the doorway to his bed as there is no clear path. 

As the father and son start to clear the clutter, Peter is seen anxiously hanging over them, instructing them not to throw away a bucket of paint, newspapers and an empty box.

'I'm worried you'll throw away things that are valuable to me', he argues.

And his shopping habit is so bad that he is even seen receiving a delivery during the clean-out process.

But while the pair go through his old newspaper clippings, they stumble across some impressive articles showcasing his achievements. 

The bedroom is so full with clutter that Peter has to jump from the doorway to his bed as there is no clear path
The bedroom is so full with clutter that Peter has to jump from the doorway to his bed as there is no clear path

The bedroom is so full with clutter that Peter has to jump from the doorway to his bed as there is no clear path

Steve and Jamie find the rest of the flat is no better, with the kitchen so piled high with appliances and piles of purchases, and he is unable to push the door open
Steve and Jamie find the rest of the flat is no better, with the kitchen so piled high with appliances and piles of purchases, and he is unable to push the door open

Steve and Jamie find the rest of the flat is no better, with the kitchen so piled high with appliances and piles of purchases, and he is unable to push the door open

'I don't think I've ever seen as much stuff come out of a one-bedroom flat', Jamie gasps as he loads up a four vans full of 150 boxes of belongings, following two trips to the charity shop
'I don't think I've ever seen as much stuff come out of a one-bedroom flat', Jamie gasps as he loads up a four vans full of 150 boxes of belongings, following two trips to the charity shop

'I don't think I've ever seen as much stuff come out of a one-bedroom flat', Jamie gasps as he loads up a four vans full of 150 boxes of belongings, following two trips to the charity shop

Jamie says: 'Peter's dedicated his last 25 years to raising money for various local communities.'

Turning to Steve, Jamie adds: 'He's spent much of his life giving so let's make this job work for him'.

As Peter is struggling to part with any of his belongings, the trio compromise on a storage facility to keep his belongings in. 

'I don't think I've ever seen as much stuff come out of a one-bedroom flat', Jamie gasps as he loads up a four vans full of 150 boxes of belongings, following two trips to the charity shop. 

However in just four days they manage to clear most of the clutter, leaving the home unrecognisable as an ecstatic Peter returns
However in just four days they manage to clear most of the clutter, leaving the home unrecognisable as an ecstatic Peter returns

However in just four days they manage to clear most of the clutter, leaving the home unrecognisable as an ecstatic Peter returns

The corridor, pictured, has completely turned around and allows full access to every room and a view of the flat
The corridor, pictured, has completely turned around and allows full access to every room and a view of the flat

The corridor, pictured, has completely turned around and allows full access to every room and a view of the flat

'Happy isn't the word, it's unbelievable that someone could give you your life back- and that's exactly what you have done', he says as he admired the empty kitchen 
'Happy isn't the word, it's unbelievable that someone could give you your life back- and that's exactly what you have done', he says as he admired the empty kitchen 

'Happy isn't the word, it's unbelievable that someone could give you your life back- and that's exactly what you have done', he says as he admired the empty kitchen 

And he no longer needs to jump onto his bed from the door as there is a clear path along with shelves for his beloved books and records
And he no longer needs to jump onto his bed from the door as there is a clear path along with shelves for his beloved books and records

And he no longer needs to jump onto his bed from the door as there is a clear path along with shelves for his beloved books and records

His living room is unrecognisable from the clutter left inside before and everything now has its place
His living room is unrecognisable from the clutter left inside before and everything now has its place

His living room is unrecognisable from the clutter left inside before and everything now has its place

However, in just four days they manage to clear most of the clutter, leaving the home unrecognisable as an ecstatic Peter returns. 

'Oh my god, I can't believe it', Peter gasps as he returns to an empty corridor. 

'Happy isn't the word, it's unbelievable that someone could give you your life back- and that's exactly what you have done', he adds. 

'I can't believe it's the same house', he says, as he breaks out his old dance moves.

'I can't believe it's the same house', he says, as he breaks out in his old dance moves alongside the duo
'I can't believe it's the same house', he says, as he breaks out in his old dance moves alongside the duo

'I can't believe it's the same house', he says, as he breaks out in his old dance moves alongside the duo

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